Our Common Good
Who is Eric Cantor to say that it’s okay for some women to get beaten and raped? If they happen to be Native women who are attacked by a non-Native man, as far as Eric Cantor is concerned, those women are tossed.

Terry O’Neill - President of National Organization for Women

Just so y’all understand the height of all bullshit this is, the JUSTICE DEPARTMENT has already backed reauthorization. All tribal jurisdiction concerns have already been vetted.

Eric Cantor and his band of assholes are the ONLY ones having a problem with this.

(via nncharlesz)

demnewswire:

Mitt Romney’s loss in the 2012 presidential election this month brought unexpected collateral damage on another Republican drive - the much-touted “Young Guns” effort to bring a new crop of party stars to Washington.

The GOP’s recruitment campaign was led in California by Rep. Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield, the House majority whip, who joined Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia and 2012 vice presidential candidate Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin as the founders of the group touted as “a new generation of conservative leaders” on Capitol Hill.

Their nationwide effort, funded by the National Republican Congressional Committee, aimed to recruit and promote rising new stars in the party who were chosen for their viability and fundraising potential. It was billed as the best way to revive the party and cultivate new GOP legislators in California and other blue states.

But the results at the polls weren’t impressive. All but one of the Young Guns candidates in California were defeated, including Ricky Gill, the 25-year-old Indian American from San Joaquin County, while some longtime GOP veterans lost, including Rep. Dan Lundgren of Gold River (Sacramento County), who fell to up-and-coming Democrat Ami Bera.

House Republicans like to talk about the need to find common ground with President Obama to make progress on important national issues, especially after the election. Yet within days, they were setting an agenda to eliminate an important element of his signature domestic achievement, the Affordable Care Act.

Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia, the majority leader, recently proposed that House Republicans set their sights on repealing the part of the law that creates an independent board that is supposed to help limit growth in Medicare spending. Increases in Medicare spending have already slowed substantially, but the board will be needed to make sure that they stay low after 2014, when most of the law takes effect.

[…]

If the projected growth rate in per capita Medicare spending exceeds specified targets pegged initially to an average of general and medical inflation and later to gross domestic product, the board must recommend changes (most likely cuts in payments to health care providers) to bring the growth rate back in line. Congress can override the board’s recommendations, but it must still find equivalent savings.

The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that repealing the board might drive up federal spending on Medicare by $3.1 billion over a decade. Without pressure from such a board, Congress is apt to be weak in resisting demands by powerful health care groups and industries for higher Medicare reimbursements.

Mr. Cantor apparently believes that throwing around the false charge that the board will harm patient care will persuade enough members of the Democrat-led Senate to follow the House, which has voted twice to repeal the board. In a recent letter to House Republicans, Mr. Cantor said that “one of our most successful critiques” of the president’s health care reforms was that “Obamacare put the government between doctors and patients.”

Mr. Cantor has suggested that seven Democratic senators who will be up for re-election in 2014 in states that the Romney-Ryan ticket just carried might yield to Republican pressure. They would be foolish to fall for the scare tactics and force Mr. Obama to have to veto a repeal bill that would eliminate a crucial cost-saving measure.

'Baby Killer' Spray-Painted On Campaign Office Of Wayne Powell, Eric Cantor's Opponent
Vandals spray-painted the words “Baby Killer” on the campaign headquarters of Wayne Powell, the Democrat challenging Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), and wrote “Nigger Lover” on a sign in front of another one of his offices, a Powell spokesman confirmed Saturday to The Huffington Post.
A tipster gave HuffPost a heads up on the incidents, and Powell campaign spokesman Brendan MacArthur confirmed the vandalism at the Midlothian and Henrico offices. MacArthur said the attacks happened Friday night and police departments in both counties have been alerted.

'Baby Killer' Spray-Painted On Campaign Office Of Wayne Powell, Eric Cantor's Opponent

Vandals spray-painted the words “Baby Killer” on the campaign headquarters of Wayne Powell, the Democrat challenging Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), and wrote “Nigger Lover” on a sign in front of another one of his offices, a Powell spokesman confirmed Saturday to The Huffington Post.

A tipster gave HuffPost a heads up on the incidents, and Powell campaign spokesman Brendan MacArthur confirmed the vandalism at the Midlothian and Henrico offices. MacArthur said the attacks happened Friday night and police departments in both counties have been alerted.


Democratic challenger, Wayne Powell to Eric Cantor during their debate on 10/1/2012

timekiller-s:

6dogs9cats:

Congress just returned from vacation last week after a month off, but apparently they’re planning to go on vacation again for another two months.

House Republican Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) announced Friday that after next week, the House will stand in recess until November 13. His plan for a nearly two month vacation will undoubtedly allow more time for campaigning, but will leave several vital bills awaiting action. […]

Four years ago, Republicans objected when then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) adjourned Congress for a five-week August recess without bringing up their energy legislation. Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) shouted “Madame Speaker, where art thou? Where oh where has Congress gone?” Now, they plan a two month vacation, even if it means allowing vital programs to expire and working families to suffer.

Congress draws a salary of roughly $174,000 per year while going on vacation for half of it.

And Republicans complain about teachers’ salaries. Teachers have a much more difficult and stressful job than congress and have less vacation time.

Meanwhile, the 2012 farm bill still hasn’t been passed and the Republicans have continued to block the renewal of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Republicans object to the revised version of VAWA because it extends existing protections to native American tribes, immigrants, and members of the LGBT community.

And the Republicans say, “but … but … those aren’t important … “

The Party of No: New Details on the GOP Plot to Obstruct Obama

TIME just published “The Party of No,” an article adapted from my new book, The New New Deal: The Hidden Story of Change in the Obama Era. It reveals some of my reporting on the Republican plot to obstruct President Obama before he even took office, including secret meetings led by House GOP Whip Eric Cantor (in December 2008) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (in early January 2009) where they laid out their daring (though cynical and political) no-honeymoon strategy of all-out resistance to a popular president-elect during an economic emergency. “If he was for it,” former Ohio senator George Voinovich explained, “we had to be against it.”The excerpt includes a special bonus nugget of Mitt Romney dissing the Tea Party.

But as we say in the sales world: There’s more! I’m going to be blogging some of the news and larger themes from the book here at time.com, and I’ll kick it off with more scenes from the early days of the Republican Strategy of No. Read on to hear what Joe Biden’s sources in the Senate GOP were telling him, some candid pillow talk between a Republican staffer and an Obama aide, and a top Republican admitting his party didn’t want to “play.” I’ll start with a scene I consider a turning point in the Obama era, when the new president came to the Hill to extend his hand and the GOP spurned it.

Read more

Leave it to Republican House members Eric Cantor, Kevin McCarthy, and Paul Ryan, who call themselves the Young Guns, to try to adapt “Man Up” for the other half of the population. Their effort, which is called the Woman Up campaign, manages to embody pretty much every aspect of machismo.

The logo is the first disaster, with an erect arrow shooting up from the right line of the letter U in “Up”—thus making the symbol for man.

Then there is the fact that the Young Guns, whose stated goal is to “grow the Republican majority in the House,” are still supporting a male cast. According to Rachel Maddow, of the ninety-four candidates the Young Guns are backing for Congress, only fourteen are female.

And there’s the little issue of the Republican War on Women, which, in part, has led to a double-digit gender gap (so far) between Obama and Romney. It seems the Young Guns, and the Republicans in general, are counting on a collective amnesia about all this come November.

But the Young Guns also seem to be promoting something else through their variant on “Man Up”—the ongoing trend (think Sarah Palin, Michele Bachmann, all the rightwing blondes on Fox News) of trying to make bellicosity and aggression the defining elements of an empowered, Republican version of femininity. In this world, being a “feminist” (a label Palin laughably sought to claim) means packing a gun, being verbally abusive toward anyone you disagree with, intolerant of anyone who is LGBT, anti-choice, contemptuous of the poor, hostile to any government program that doesn’t benefit corporate elites, and, in a nice twist, totally opposed to women’s rights: in other words, Newt Gingrich in a skirt (but preferably hotted up).

The Woman Up campaign is trying to tell us that what is truly empowering for women is to talk and act just like conservative men. Under the rhetorical veneer of female strength and assertiveness, it is really about making patriarchy pleasurable for women.

The FBI probed a late-night swim in the Sea of Galilee that involved drinking, numerous GOP freshmen lawmakers, top leadership staff – and one nude member of Congress, according to more than a dozen sources, including eyewitnesses.

During a fact-finding congressional trip to the Holy Land last summer, Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-Kan.) took off his clothes and jumped into the sea, joining a number of members, their families and GOP staff during a night out in Israel, the sources told POLITICO. Other participants, including the daughter of another congressman, swam fully clothed while some lawmakers partially disrobed. More than 20 people took part in the late-night dip in the sea, according to sources who took part in the trip.

[…]

These GOP sources confirmed the following freshmen lawmakers also went swimming that night: Rep. Steve Southerland (R-Fla.) and his daughter; Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) and his wife; Reps. Ben Quayle (R-Ariz.), Jeff Denham (R-Calif.) and Michael Grimm (R-N.Y.). Many of the lawmakers who ventured into the ocean said they did so because of the religious significance of the waters. Others said they were simply cooling off after a long day. Several privately admitted that alcohol may have played a role in why some of those present decided to jump in.

[…]

The FBI looked into whether any inappropriate behavior occurred, but the interviews do not appear to have resulted in any formal allegations of wrongdoing.

But Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.), who was the senior most GOP lawmaker in Israel on the trip, was so upset about the antics that he rebuked the 30 lawmakers the morning after the Aug. 18. 2011, incident, saying they were distracting from the mission of the trip.

Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) was also on the privately funded excursion, which means two of the three top Republicans were a part of this trip. Neither Cantor nor McCarthy went swimming that night, the sources said. Some of their staff did.

justinspoliticalcorner:

A day after making the case for tolerance of gays and Muslims, Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (VA) defended his colleague Rep. Michele Bachmann’s (R-MN) Islamophobic quest to root out supposed Muslim Brotherhood “deep penetration” of the U.S. government. Cantor lent credence to Bachmann’s claims by saying her accusations came from her “concern about the security of the country,” and then professed ignorance about her allegations.

CBS host Charlie Rose asked Cantor about his comments to BuzzFeed on Thursday that “It’s a bad thing to look at a Muslim and think bad things.”

From the 07.26.2012 edition of CBS’s This Morning:

This isn’t Cantor’s first brush with Islamophobia — and, just like the last two days, he’s ended up on both sides of the story before. In 2011, Cantor endorsed fellow Virginia Republican David Ramadan, a practicing Muslim whose successful bid for a seat in the state House of Delegates was opposed by the Islamophobe Frank Gaffney, the progenitor of Bachmann’s charges. Earlier that year, though, Cantor co-hosted a Capitol Hill screening of a film by the Islamophobic Clarion Fund, where Gaffney sits on the board.

h/t: Ali Gharib at Think Progress Security

Expected:

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) said Thursday that the Republican-led House will vote on repealing the health care law soon after the July 4 recess.

Let’s hope the Republican Party is bought and paid for by the rich, because the other explanation for its obsession with raising taxes at the bottom is far more disturbing
generalbriefing:

occupyallstreets:

Republican Eric Cantor Suggests Raising Taxes On The Poor
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) revived one of the GOP’s favorite talking points this morning, telling attendees at a Politico-sponsored breakfast event that it was imperative that Congress address the “problem” that “more than 45 percent” of Americans aren’t paying income taxes.
The GOP has repeatedly made the claim that the poorest Americans need more “skin in the game.” Today, response to a question by ABC’s Jon Karl, Cantor made it clear that Republicans are interested in raising taxes on the poor while lowering tax rates for everyone else as part of any comprehensive tax reform plan:

CANTOR: We also know that over 45 percent of the people in this country don’t pay income taxes at all, and we have to question whether that’s fair. And should we broaden the base in a way that we can lower the rates for everybody that pays taxes.[…]
KARL: Just wondering, what do you do about that? Are you saying we need to have a tax increase on the 45 percent who right now pay no federal income tax?
CANTOR: I’m saying that, just in a macro way of looking at it, you’ve got to discuss that issue. … How do you deal with a shrinking pie and number of people and entities that support the operations of government, and how do you go about continuing to milk them more, if that’s what some want to do, but preserve their ability to provide the growth engine? … I’ve never believed that you go raise taxes on those that have been successful that are paying in, taking away from them, so that you just hand out and give to someone else.

ThinkProgress has repeatedly explained why many Americans don’t pay income taxes — most either don’t make enough money or are college students or seniors with no yearly incomes. And those Americans are subject to various other forms of taxation, including the federal payroll tax.
The richest Americans, meanwhile, have seen their tax rates fall even as their incomes skyrocketed, contributing to rising inequality and exploding federal deficits. As Cantor made plain today, though, none of that matters. In addition to making the poor and middle classshoulder the burden of draconian budget cuts, Republicans want to raise their taxes too.
Source

Surprised? You shouldn’t be. Republicans: winning the Asshole Olympics since 1980.

generalbriefing:

occupyallstreets:

Republican Eric Cantor Suggests Raising Taxes On The Poor

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) revived one of the GOP’s favorite talking points this morning, telling attendees at a Politico-sponsored breakfast event that it was imperative that Congress address the “problem” that “more than 45 percent” of Americans aren’t paying income taxes.

The GOP has repeatedly made the claim that the poorest Americans need more “skin in the game.” Today, response to a question by ABC’s Jon Karl, Cantor made it clear that Republicans are interested in raising taxes on the poor while lowering tax rates for everyone else as part of any comprehensive tax reform plan:

CANTOR: We also know that over 45 percent of the people in this country don’t pay income taxes at all, and we have to question whether that’s fair. And should we broaden the base in a way that we can lower the rates for everybody that pays taxes.[…]

KARL: Just wondering, what do you do about that? Are you saying we need to have a tax increase on the 45 percent who right now pay no federal income tax?

CANTOR: I’m saying that, just in a macro way of looking at it, you’ve got to discuss that issue. … How do you deal with a shrinking pie and number of people and entities that support the operations of government, and how do you go about continuing to milk them more, if that’s what some want to do, but preserve their ability to provide the growth engine? … I’ve never believed that you go raise taxes on those that have been successful that are paying in, taking away from them, so that you just hand out and give to someone else.

ThinkProgress has repeatedly explained why many Americans don’t pay income taxes — most either don’t make enough money or are college students or seniors with no yearly incomes. And those Americans are subject to various other forms of taxation, including the federal payroll tax.

The richest Americans, meanwhile, have seen their tax rates fall even as their incomes skyrocketed, contributing to rising inequality and exploding federal deficits. As Cantor made plain today, though, none of that matters. In addition to making the poor and middle classshoulder the burden of draconian budget cuts, Republicans want to raise their taxes too.

Source

Surprised? You shouldn’t be. Republicans: winning the Asshole Olympics since 1980.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor went into damage control mode Friday following the revelation that he contributed $25,000 to a super PAC devoted to defeating incumbent House members — including numerous Republicans.

The news of Cantor’s contribution to the Campaign for Primary Accountability, first reported by Roll Call Friday afternoon and confirmed by a spokesman for the super PAC, was said to have taken party leaders by surprise. House Speaker John Boehner, House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, and National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Pete Sessions, knowledgeable aides said, had not received advance word that the contribution had been made.

liberalsarecool:

“…we need to make sure that this president is also going to stand by Israel and not allow his administration to somehow speak contrary to what our ally thinks is in its best interest.” - Rep. Eric Cantor, the No. 2 Republican in the House of Representatives

Cantor thinks America needs to take a backseat in foreign policy.

via Dan Drezner:

Now, this bolded part of the quote is quite extraordinary, if you think about it.  Apparently, Cantor’s standard with respect to American policy towards Israel is that the U.S. government cannot and should not contradict anything that Israel’s government says.  What’s good for Israel’s national interests — as defined solely by Israel — serves American interests as well. 

Step back for a second and ask yourself if this is true of any other U.S. ally.  A NATO member?  Nah, we disagree with them all the time.  Japan?  Nope, there was a pretty bruising fight with that country’s government on Okinawa bases just a few years ago.  Canada?  Hell, Mitt Romney pretty much made it clear that the U.S. is gonna get Canada’s oil and I heard nary a peep of criticism from the GOP foreign policy establishment.  I can’t think of a Latin American, Pacific Rim or Central Asian ally that meets this criteria. 

A few months ago, I asked whether, in the eyes of some, Israel was now the most super-special ally we have.  I think statements like Cantor’s are an excellent signal that the answer appears to be yes.