Our Common Good
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Conservative Sen. Jim DeMint is resigning, and Stephen Colbert wants the job. All he wants us to do is tweet #SenatorColbert at Gov. Nikki Haley.Want to help make #SenatorColbert a reality? Check out Colbert’s pitch here.
Reblog/share/like this if you want Senator Colbert to happen.


“Tweet @nikkihaley & tell her why I belong in the US Senate. For one, I wouldn’t just block legislation, I’d body-check it! #SenatorColbert”
For our money, we want Alvin Greene back in. Here’s why:

shortformblog:

hypervocal:

Conservative Sen. Jim DeMint is resigning, and Stephen Colbert wants the job. All he wants us to do is tweet #SenatorColbert at Gov. Nikki Haley.

Want to help make #SenatorColbert a reality? Check out Colbert’s pitch here.

Reblog/share/like this if you want Senator Colbert to happen.

“Tweet @nikkihaley & tell her why I belong in the US Senate. For one, I wouldn’t just block legislation, I’d body-check it! #SenatorColbert”

For our money, we want Alvin Greene back in. Here’s why:

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As Politico points out, whether or not the health reform law is able to operate as it was intended — and expand coverage to about 30 million previously uninsured Americans — largely depends on the extent that governors agree to cooperate in their states. But some Republican governors have already made it clear that they don’t plan on playing nice during Obama’s second term

glitter-femin1sts:

primsuspect:

See if you are eligible to vote at http://www.canivote.org/

*these issues don’t just affect women*

glitter-femin1sts:

primsuspect:

See if you are eligible to vote at http://www.canivote.org/

*these issues don’t just affect women*

mikeo56:

Letting Us Die: Republican Governors Are The New “Death Panel”
Meet the newest “Death Panel” on the block.
They are the six Republican governors who have vowed refuse the Medicaid expansion that will happen most other states, under the Affordable Care Act — Rick Scott (FL), Rick Perry (TX), Phil Bryant (MS), Nikki Haley (SC), Terry Branstad (IA), and Bobby Jindal (LA). These Republican governors are opening the “trap door”  that the Supreme Court installed in the Affordable Care Act, even at it upheld most of the law. But it’s the poorest residents in these states, many of whom are African American and Latino, and who would have gained health coverage and access to care, that will fall through that trap door. 
While the Court upheld the bulk of the Affordable Care Act, it weakened the Medicaid expansion written into the bill.  Since Medicaid is a federally-funded, state-administered program, under the health care reform law, the federal government would pay 100% of the state governments’ additional costs for the first three years of the Medicaid expansion, and 93% each year after that.  As the law was written, the federal government could take away the existing Medicaid funding of states that refused the Medicaid expansion. However, the Supreme Court ruled that states could refuse to expand their Medicaid programs, and the federal government can’t penalize them by taking away their existing Medicaid funding.
In other words, the Supreme Right Wing Court left the “carrot” but took away the “stick,” and in the process cut a hole in health care reform just big enough for millions of Americans who need its benefits the most to slip right through.
GOP and GOP Supreme Court Scum Are Shit

mikeo56:

Letting Us Die: Republican Governors Are The New “Death Panel”

Meet the newest “Death Panel” on the block.

They are the six Republican governors who have vowed refuse the Medicaid expansion that will happen most other states, under the Affordable Care Act — Rick Scott (FL), Rick Perry (TX), Phil Bryant (MS), Nikki Haley (SC), Terry Branstad (IA), and Bobby Jindal (LA). These Republican governors are opening the “trap door”  that the Supreme Court installed in the Affordable Care Act, even at it upheld most of the law. But it’s the poorest residents in these states, many of whom are African American and Latino, and who would have gained health coverage and access to care, that will fall through that trap door. 

While the Court upheld the bulk of the Affordable Care Act, it weakened the Medicaid expansion written into the bill.  Since Medicaid is a federally-funded, state-administered program, under the health care reform law, the federal government would pay 100% of the state governments’ additional costs for the first three years of the Medicaid expansion, and 93% each year after that.  As the law was written, the federal government could take away the existing Medicaid funding of states that refused the Medicaid expansion. However, the Supreme Court ruled that states could refuse to expand their Medicaid programs, and the federal government can’t penalize them by taking away their existing Medicaid funding.

In other words, the Supreme Right Wing Court left the “carrot” but took away the “stick,” and in the process cut a hole in health care reform just big enough for millions of Americans who need its benefits the most to slip right through.

GOP and GOP Supreme Court Scum Are Shit

The problem is it’s like when you give something to a child. They’re always going to figure out how they can get away with a little more.
South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley • In a written statement, explaining her reasoning for slashing the budget of the state’s rape crisis center budget. Crisis centers only help a small portion of residents, and distract from the state health department’s goal of providing treatment to all residents of South Carolina according to Governor Haley. ”Being raped is traumatic enough, but having to navigate that system, going to court by yourself, going to the hospital for a really intrusive and painful exam by yourself is horrific,” counters South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault executive director Pam Jacobs, adding, ”Unfortunately, that’s the solution rape victims may be in if this veto is not overridden.”   source (viafollow)

The House Ethics Committee officially reopened Wednesday an ethics complaint that accuses South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley of illegally lobbying for two previous employers before she became governor.

This is a president that is trying to create distractions. There is no war on women. Women are doing well.

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, appearing on The O’Reilly Factor is continuing to deny that the GOP is waging a war against women and their civil rights.

What are you meaning by “well,” Haley?

Is it “well” that all of the drops of people in the labors force were women, or that 88 percent of jobs that went to anyone during the recession went to men?

Haley, in your own state, women are only paid 76 cents of every dollar that a man makes, and only own 28% of businesses, even though women make up over half of the state’s population!

Nikki Haley, if this is what you mean by women doing “well,” I would hate to see what it means when women are “struggling.”

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

Two well-placed legal experts have independently told Palmetto Public Record they expect the U.S. Department of Justice to issue an indictment against South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley on charges of tax fraud as early as this week.

A highly ranked federal official has also privately confirmed rumblings of an investigation and possible indictment of the governor, though the official was not aware of the specific timeframe.

Yesterday, Palmetto Public Record exclusively reported that the Internal Revenue Service has been investigating since March of 2011 the Sikh worship center run by Gov. Haley’s father. At least five lawsuits have been filed against the Sikh Society of South Carolina since 2010, alleging that the group bilked contractors out of nearly $130,000 for the construction of a new temple.

Gov. Haley is reported to have managed the temple’s finances as late as 2003, and our sources believe any indictment would center on what happened to the missing money.

Nikki Haley and the Temple Loan: Where did the money go?

But if and when the indictment comes down, what will it say? The investigation began with the Internal Revenue Service looking into evidence that the Sikh temple run by Gov. Haley’s father violated its tax-exempt status by supporting Haley’s bid for governor, but that’s not a criminal offense. So what did the IRS investigation turn up that got the Justice Department involved?

In 2009, the Sikh Society of South Carolina took out a $750,000 loan from BB&T Bank with the help of bank president Mike Brenan. The purpose of the loan was to build a new temple on the Sikh Society’s land in Chapin, but for some reason the contractors never got paid. At least five lawsuits have been filed against the Sikh Society since 2010, alleging that the group bilked contractors out of nearly $130,000.

Meanwhile, the new temple sits half-complete off Broad River Road as weeds take over the abandoned construction site. In order to recoup their money, the contractors have asked a judge to foreclose on the temple and sell the land, leaving the Sikh Society without a place to worship.

So what happened to the money? Did it “disappear” into the Randhawa family’s million-dollar waterfront home on Lake Murray, or (as our sources have speculated) did some of it go into the governor’s campaign account? Whatever happened to the money, we do know what happened to Brenan: Gov. Nikki Haley appointed him to the state Board of Education.

With creditors closing in, the Sikh Society began asking its worshipers and other members of the community to donate money — ostensibly to finish building the temple, but in reality to pay off the society’s mass of outstanding debts. Donors are asked to mail checks directly to the Randhawas’ house, even though Gov. Haley’s father isn’t the society’s registered agent.

Not crazy enough for the crazies.

Like Rick Perry, Nikki Haley, isn’t big on saving emails - despite running on a platform promising transparency.

timetruthhumor:

As ThinkProgress reported earlier this month, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley (R) promised to drive residents whose right to vote will be jeopordized by her new voter ID law to the DMV to help them obtain a photo license. “Find the people who say this is invading their rights and I will go take them to the DMV myself and help them,” Haley said in a local TV interview.

This week, 76-year-old Army veteran Robert Tucker, who lacks an accurate birth certificate and thus ID, tried to take up Haley on her offer. Tucker’s cousin, Edith Cunningham, caught wind of Haley’s promise and decided to ask the governor for a ride on Tucker’s behalf, only to be turned down:

Read more

…Haley has been navigating a series of land mines—IRS disputes, questionable business deals and appointments, multiple adultery allegations—any one of which threatens to blow up her political career. “I believe she is the most corrupt person to occupy the governor’s mansion since Reconstruction,” declared John Rainey, a longtime Republican fundraiser and power broker who chaired the state’s Board of Economic Advisers for eight years. A 69-year-old attorney, Rainey is an aristocratic iconoclast who never bought the Haley myth. “I do not know of any person who ran for governor in my lifetime with as many charges against him or her as she has had that went unanswered,” he told me on a recent afternoon at his sprawling horse farm outside the small town of Camden. “The Democrats got Alvin Greene; we got Nikki Haley. Because nobody bothered to check these guys out.”

[…]

When Haley took office in January, her backbencher status gave her no support structure in state government. Since then she’s appointed a surprising number of cronies and loyalists to bureaucratic functions in order to construct such a network. Many state boards have staggered terms to prevent unilateral decimation of institutional knowledge, but because former Governor Mark Sanford left so many appointees in place when their terms expired, there was a glut of personnel for Haley to dispense with as she pleased. At an early stage in the bloodbath, the capital city daily newspaper, the State, pointed out that of the fifty-nine she had already replaced, twenty-six were donors to her campaign.

Such wholesale housecleaning was not only sharply at variance with what the last GOP governor had done when taking over from a member of the same party; it also reeked of the kind of favor trading Haley had run against on the stump. “She was the Tea Party candidate, and she was gonna sweep the good old boys out,” Clemson University political scientist David Woodard said about Haley’s appointments at the time. Woodard is also a Republican consultant who wrote Why We Whisper: Restoring Our Right to Say It’s Wrong with South Carolina senator and Tea Party darling Jim DeMint. “In effect, she does the same sort of cronyism that is characteristic of previous governors,” said Woodard.

Meanwhile, Haley’s approach to the process offended the state’s genteel Southern traditions. In March, without announcing it, Haley quietly excised the most generous benefactor of the University of South Carolina, billionaire financier and philanthropist Darla Moore, from the school’s board of trustees, replacing her with a campaign contributor and little-known lawyer from Haley’s district. When the alternative weekly Free Times broke the news of the move—which led to student protests and a broader public backlash—Haley was deceptive about her reasons for having made the change.

[…]

Perhaps most disturbing, however, is her hiring of Christian Soura, 32, who moved to South Carolina to take an unannounced job in the Haley administration at a salary of a dollar a year. The former secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Administration under Democratic Governor Ed Rendell, Soura, whom Haley calls “Mr. Fix It,” is tasked with setting up a similar department in the Palmetto State.

A bill currently moving through the state legislature would make the department a cabinet agency under the governor, allowing a governor-appointed director to oversee much of state administration. In early June, after the legislature adjourned without passing it, Haley ordered legislators back to Columbia for an emergency special session, without pay, in an attempt to bully them into passing the bill. It was a strident power play that offended legislative leaders in both parties and led the Senate president, a fellow Republican, to sue her in order to block it. The State Supreme Court quickly sided with him, ruling that Haley had acted outside her constitutional authority.

While the dollar-a-year arrangement gives Soura access to state government, he’ll draw his real compensation from a newly created think tank, the South Carolina Center for Transforming Government, which doesn’t have to disclose its funding.

The murky nature of Soura’s presence has caused headaches for the new state treasurer, Republican Curtis Loftis. Loftis accuses Soura of undermining his authority, violating established protocols and circumventing the treasurer’s office by contacting services that determine the state’s credit rating behind Loftis’s back. “We don’t have any knowledge of who’s paying him or what his motives are,” a frustrated Loftis said recently. “We have an unknown dollar-a-year man.”

[…]

Two men have signed sworn affidavits alleging they had sexual affairs with the married mother of two, stemming from 2007 and 2008, respectively. She has denied them and has agreed to resign as governor if either is proven. Questions about her private life might best remain a family matter except that both men have high political profiles, and one is writing a tell-all book about his relationship with Haley. Will Folks, a former spokesman for then–Governor Sanford who worked for Haley in 2007, is a political consultant who runs a popular South Carolina blog, FITSNews. He is coy about his book contract but has released a steamy excerpt on his website. “If she were to appear on a national ticket, it would be the end of that ticket,” Folks told me.

Still, like so many Palmetto State chief executives before her, Haley seems to be angling for a spot on a national ticket. She is already penning her memoir. “Every governor we’ve had since Carroll Campbell has had national aspirations, but with her it’s more naked and obvious,” says Brad Warthen, a Columbia advertising man who until 2009 was the longtime editorial page editor of the State. Warthen endorsed Haley in two legislative elections and chronicled her rise beginning about seven years ago. In that time, he says, she has morphed from a naïve newcomer, to a politician he thought could become a good force in the legislature, to something approaching megalomania.

“I think she’s had her head turned by discovering where demagoguery will get you,” Warthen told me. “I don’t think that’s totally who she was before. I think she has developed in this direction. It’s a B.F. Skinner behavioral reinforcement thing; she has been rewarded and rewarded and rewarded. This has worked for her. And she continues to charm the national media. Because you know what? They don’t care. It’s just a story.”