Our Common Good

joshsternberg:

joshsternberg:

Looking for recent (or not so recent) graduates seeking to enter the glamorous world of  advertising but finding difficulty in landing that elusive entry job.

Email me: josh at digiday dot com.

Update: this is not for a job, but for a story I’m working on about the trials and tribulations recent grads are facing when looking for jobs in the ad biz.

Reblogging for both signal boost (hey big Tumblrs — help a reporter out!) and the little update that, if I were a better journalist should have been in the original post, I added. Lesson learned? I’m an idiot. But I want to write about you and help you land a job!

early-onset-of-night:

This is a real ad :]

They have a history of similar, wonderful ads.

early-onset-of-night:

This is a real ad :]

They have a history of similar, wonderful ads.

joshsternberg:

In which I interview Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall.

Josh Marshall, editor and publisher of Talking Points Memo, sits in the back corner of the liberal-leaning political site’s L-shaped open office in Manhattan. He holds court for guests on a couch behind his desk, as he drapes his legs over his chair. The din of the 20 editorial staffers punctuates the conversation. The setting is a mix of newsroom and startup: reporters share tables, shelves of books litter the space, Macs are fired up and four televisions bask the office with the warming glow of cable news, a major industry award sits buried behind bottles of liquor.

While other early political bloggers, like the Daily Beast’s Andrew Sullivan, moved their writing to more mainstream publications, Marshall took a different path, sticking to his roots and building his one-man band blog into a real, honest-to-God media company. The question is whether his by-the-bootstraps approach will work in a rough ad market for news sites and with several well-heeled, aggressive competitors.

cognitivedissonance:

From ThinkProgress:

Radio-Info.com reports that Premiere Networks, which syndicates the Rush Limbaugh show, told its affiliate radio stations that they are suspending national advertising for two weeks. Rush Limbaugh is normally provided to afflilates for free in return for running several minutes of national advertisements provided by Premiere each hour. These ads called “barter spots.” These spots are how Premiere makes its money off of Rush Limbaugh and other shows it syndicates.

But without explanation, Premiere has supended these national advertisements for two weeks. Radio-Info.com calls the move “unusual.” The development suggests that Rush Limbaughs incessant sexist attacks on Sandra Fluke have caused severe damage to the show.

People are taking the piss out of you everyday. They butt into your life, take a cheap shot at you and then disappear. They leer at you from tall buildings and make you feel small. They make flippant comments from buses that imply you’re not sexy enough and that all the fun is happening somewhere else. They are on TV making your girlfriend feel inadequate. They have access to the most sophisticated technology the world has ever seen and they bully you with it. They are The Advertisers and they are laughing at you.

You, however, are forbidden to touch them. Trademarks, intellectual property rights and copyright law mean advertisers can say what they like wherever they like with total impunity.

Fuck that. Any advert in a public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is yours. It’s yours to take, re-arrange and re-use. You can do whatever you like with it. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw at your head.

You owe the companies nothing. Less than nothing, you especially don’t owe them any courtesy. They owe you. They have re-arranged the world to put themselves in front of you. They never asked for your permission, don’t even start asking for theirs.

-Banksy, Make Art, Not Ads (via practicalunbreakablehearts)

God this makes me want to incite a riot rather than sit here trying to finish a paper and procrastinating on tumblr.

(via ftmfeminist)

Can conscience defeat cash?

—Bill Moyers, in a pitch for FlackCheck.org’s “Stand by Your Ad” campaign.

The Columbia Journalism Review’s T.C. Brown includes Moyers’ quote in a new article looking at the advertising onslaught from GOP candidates’ super PACs leading up to the Ohio primary, highlighting FlackCheck’s initiative that urges TV stations to block deceptive ads. But as Brown points out, resisting the financial incentives while dealing with the additional headaches of ad-vetting pose challenges for the campaign’s success.

Read more about “Stand By Your Ad” here. Do you think broadcasters should incorporate a more stringent fact-checking process for ads funded by outside groups such as super PACs and politically-active nonprofit groups? Reblog this post with your comments. 

(via source2012)

If a person who heard what Limbaugh said about Sandra Fluke got an emailed list of local advertisers whose commercials aired during the Limbaugh show, that person can pick up the phone and call each local or regional business on that list. They can tell them, “I will not be eating at your restaurant for as long as you advertise with that man. When you stop, I will come back. And, by the way, I am tweeting, emailing, and Facebook messaging every person I know to tell them the same thing. We’ll be listening tomorrow to see if you are still supporting him.”

Limbaugh may not care about that, but the restaurant owner sure does, even if he likes Limbaugh. If even a few people make that intention known, that owner will call the radio station and demand that his ads be pulled out of the Limbaugh show and spread elsewhere. He may even post a sign on his door expressing his support for Limbaugh, but he will eventually move his ads. In order to not lose that ad business, the station will quickly comply. Eventually, if enough advertisers bail on the program, the program gets replaced. No more Limbaugh in that town.

Limbaugh himself said it yesterday, “They’re just saying they don’t want their spots to appear in my show.” Exactly.

Limbaugh’s website says he has over 600 stations in his stable. Calls from individuals, especially people not even in the listening area, will have little effect on the decisions a station makes. But calls from the advertisers are treated like messages from God. Limbaugh maythink say that those advertisers are like a few french fries. But, the local stations do not. There are people at those stations whose job it is to beat the pavement and sell ads. They work on commission. They build relationships with those advertisers. It is in their best interests to keep those advertisers informed about where their money is best spent. If there is a huge stench around a program, local and regional advertisers will abandon it. Stations will then eventually drop it, not on principle, but out of economic necessity. And thus, the listener base dwindles. They simply won’t have it to listen to unless they subscribe online. Then, the chain effect begins. The cost of regional ads drops due to a smaller listener base. So, ad sales people have to sell more commercials to recover the lost revenue. No one wants to support a sinkhole. Eventually, the show folds.

quickhits:

Limbaugh’s slut-shaming could cripple right wing talk radio.

John Avlon, The Daily Beast:

Rush Limbaugh made the right-wing talk-radio industry, and he just might break it.
Because now the fallout from the “slut” slurs against Sandra Fluke is extending to the entire political shock-jock genre.


Premiere Networks, which distributes Limbaugh as well as a host of other right-wing talkers, sent an email out to its affiliates early Friday listing 98 large corporations that have requested their ads appear only on “programs free of content that you know are deemed to be offensive or controversial (for example, Mark Levin, Rush Limbaugh, Tom Leykis, Michael Savage, Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity).”
This is big. According to the radio-industry website Radio-Info.com, which first posted excerpts of the Premiere memo, among the 98 companies that have decided to no longer sponsor these programs are “carmakers (Ford, GM, Toyota), insurance companies (Allstate, Geico, Prudential, State Farm), and restaurants (McDonald’s, Subway).” Together, these talk-radio advertising staples represent millions of dollars in revenue.
“I have talked with several reps who report that they’re having conversations with their clients, who are asking not to be associated with specifically polarizing controversial hosts, particularly if those hosts are ‘mean-spirited,’” says author and industry expert Valerie Geller. “While most products and services offered on these shows have strong competitors, and enjoy purchasing the exposure that many of these shows and hosts can offer, they do not wish to be ‘tarred’ with the brush of anger, or endure customer anger, or, worse, product boycotts.”
Limbaugh’s a child. When he started to get pushback over his initial rant, he went on a three-day bender to prove that no one could push him around. In his hubris, he may have damaged his entire industry.

quickhits:

Limbaugh’s slut-shaming could cripple right wing talk radio.

John Avlon, The Daily Beast:

Rush Limbaugh made the right-wing talk-radio industry, and he just might break it.

Because now the fallout from the “slut” slurs against Sandra Fluke is extending to the entire political shock-jock genre.

Premiere Networks, which distributes Limbaugh as well as a host of other right-wing talkers, sent an email out to its affiliates early Friday listing 98 large corporations that have requested their ads appear only on “programs free of content that you know are deemed to be offensive or controversial (for example, Mark Levin, Rush Limbaugh, Tom Leykis, Michael Savage, Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity).”
This is big. According to the radio-industry website Radio-Info.com, which first posted excerpts of the Premiere memo, among the 98 companies that have decided to no longer sponsor these programs are “carmakers (Ford, GM, Toyota), insurance companies (Allstate, Geico, Prudential, State Farm), and restaurants (McDonald’s, Subway).” Together, these talk-radio advertising staples represent millions of dollars in revenue.

“I have talked with several reps who report that they’re having conversations with their clients, who are asking not to be associated with specifically polarizing controversial hosts, particularly if those hosts are ‘mean-spirited,’” says author and industry expert Valerie Geller. “While most products and services offered on these shows have strong competitors, and enjoy purchasing the exposure that many of these shows and hosts can offer, they do not wish to be ‘tarred’ with the brush of anger, or endure customer anger, or, worse, product boycotts.”

Limbaugh’s a child. When he started to get pushback over his initial rant, he went on a three-day bender to prove that no one could push him around. In his hubris, he may have damaged his entire industry.

Tax Resolution drops Rush

Tax Resolution drops Rush