Our Common Good
govtoversight:

The Dodd-Frank reforms turned 2 this week. Check out what they have been up to.

govtoversight:

The Dodd-Frank reforms turned 2 this week. Check out what they have been up to.

losangeleno:

“The American people understand that they did not cause this recession. Teachers did not cause this recession. Firefighters and police officers did not cause this recession. Construction workers did not cause this recession. This recession was caused by the greed, the recklessness and the illegal behavior on Wall Street.”
-Bernie Sanders

losangeleno:

“The American people understand that they did not cause this recession. Teachers did not cause this recession. Firefighters and police officers did not cause this recession. Construction workers did not cause this recession. This recession was caused by the greed, the recklessness and the illegal behavior on Wall Street.”

-Bernie Sanders

novenator:

I marched with tens of thousands of protesters yesterday in Montreal. In the second photo, I’m the one in the wearable tent. The People United, Will Never Be Defeated.

theaquabrat:

Occupy Tampa installing a community garden using recycled tires as planters.  Grand Opening on April 28th @ noon on Main St.!

Concerned by the San Francisco BART system’s decision to suspend cellular service to frustrate coordination among protesters angered by the fatal transit police shooting of an unarmed passenger, the FCC is holding a public inquiry seeking comment on who should be allowed to order cellular service shutoffs, and when. Here’s the notice, with instructions for replying.

Read the rest then get on it, Tumblr.

We didn’t really know who was going to show up for the occupation. It was all a great mystery. We had to throw it together very quickly; it was thrown into our laps the last seven weeks before the event itself. Overwhelmingly the people who showed up were young ones who felt, “We played by the rules, we went to school, we studied hard, we did everything we’re supposed to do, and now not only are we $50,000 in debt with no way out, there’s no jobs because the bankers crashed the economy—they didn’t play by the rules but they got bailed out. Now we’re stuck being told we’re deadbeats for the rest of our lives, owing money to the very people who destroyed everything.”
David Graeber, “What We Owe to Each Other” (via bostonreview)

paxamericana:

socialismartnature:

Watching Andrew Breitbart give a keynote speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference on C-SPAN. These people are literally living on another planet. “You will never meet a more intolerant group of people than the progressive left…. The Occupy movement seeks to destroy America… “

“Thank you Mr. Brietbart. Stick around, up next we’ve got Ann Coulter on why the Gay Mexican Feminazis are a threat to YOUR FREEDOMS.” 

This morning on MSNBC, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman told Chris Hayes that “the people’s uprising” should be credited for renewed efforts to investigate and prosecute big banks.

The people’s uprising, of course, is Occupy Wall Street, and the renewed efforts about which Schneiderman speaks is a “nationwide probe of wrongdoing in the mortgage-backed securities market" that he has just been named to lead.

Schneiderman’s (nearly) direct reference to Occupy Wall Street as a motivating impetus for the national probe explicitly confirms what many have been arguing: that the nation’s protest movement has shaken the halls of government at its deepest levels by transforming the national conversation about the connection between income inequality and financial corruption.

saboma:

It really is a simple perspective

saboma:

It really is a simple perspective

think-progress:

Wall Street’s recession cost 1.5 million times more than the cost of securing Occupy protests.

think-progress:

Wall Street’s recession cost 1.5 million times more than the cost of securing Occupy protests.

Some Occupy Wall Street protesters have talked of staging sit-ins at big retail stories on Black Friday. One prominent lawyer suggests that could backfire, legally. [says John Banzhaf, a legal expert who teaches a class called “Torts R Us” at George Washington University Law School.]

Here’s the sordid back-story: Linda Katehi was born in Athens in 1954 and got her undergraduate degree at the famous Athens Polytechnic. She just happened to be the right age to be a student at the Polytechnic university on the very day, November 17, 1973, when the junta sent in tanks and soldiers to crush her fellow pro-democracy students. It was only after democracy was restored in 1974–and Greek university campuses were turned into police-free “asylum zones”–that Linda Katehi eventually moved to the USA, earning her PhD at UCLA.

Earlier this year, Linda Katehi served on an “International Committee On Higher Education In Greece,” along with a handful of American, European and Asian academics. The ostensible goal was to “reform” Greece’s university system. The real problem, from the real powers behind the scenes (banksters and the EU), was how to get Greece under control as the austerity-screws tightened. It didn’t take a genius to figure out that squeezing more money from Greece’s beleaguered citizens would mean clamping down on Greece’s democracy and doing something about those pesky Greek university students. And that meant taking away the universities’ “amnesty” protection, in place for nearly four decades, so that no one, nowhere, would be safe from police truncheons, gas, or bullets.

Thanks to the EU, bankers, and UC Davis chancellor Linda Katehi, university freedom for Greece’s students has taken a huge, dark step backwards.

Here you can read a translation of the report co-authored by UC Davis’ Linda Katehi–the report which brought about the end of Greece’s “university asylum” law.What’s particularly disturbing is that Linda Katehi was the only Greek on that commission. Presumably that would give her a certain amount of extra sway–both because of her inside knowledge, and because of her moral authority among the other non-Greek committee members. And yet, Linda Katehi signed off on a report that provided the rationale for repealing Greece’s long-standing “university asylum” law. She basically helped undo the very heart and soul of Greece’s pro-democracy uprising against the junta.

broken-fall:

Goddamn Banksy, that was quick

broken-fall:

Goddamn Banksy, that was quick

 OccupyWashingtonDC.org seeks a major transformation to a participatory democracy in the economy as well as in government. For forty years, concentrated corporate interests have acted with intent to take over government and other institutions. We seek an end to the rule of concentrated wealth and corporate power by shifting control, wealth and ownership to the people.

This report puts forward evidence-based solutions that will re-start the economy and avoid placing financial burdens on future generations.  For the most part these ideas are not new.  They are well accepted by economists and are consistent with the views of super majorities of Americans on key issues.  Further, more than three-quarters of U.S. citizens say the country’s economic structure is out of balance and “favors a very small proportion of the rich over the rest of the country.” They are right. The solutions to our economic crisis are evident but they are blocked by those who profit from the status quo and control elected officials through the corrupt U.S. political system and its money-based elections.

The elites in Washington, DC seek to erase deficits that were caused by increases in war and military spending, tax breaks for the wealthy and corporations, the increased cost of health care, as well as bank bailouts, and increased costs and lost revenue from the economic collapse. The bi-partisan elites seek to cut $1.2 trillion in deficits even though there is no outcry for such cuts or evidence in the economy that they are urgently needed.  They are proposing cuts in services to seniors, students, the poor and middle-working class households who did not cause the crash but already suffer from its consequences. This report shows that we can get the economy moving, reduce the wealth divide and control government spending while helping the 99%.

This report should not be considered the demand of the Occupy Movement. It was prepared[1] by one Occupation, Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC and it does not reflect even that Occupation’s full demands.  Most of this report provides solutions to the deficit questions the Congressional Super Committee is attempting to address while also re-starting the economy.  The difference between the Occupied Super Committee report and the Congressional Super Committee report will be stark and further demonstrate the corruption and dysfunction of government.  While this report’s recommendations would benefit the 99%, the report that will come out of the congressional Super Committee will benefit the 1%. 


According to some political commentators,  Occupy Wall Street is the left’s answer to the Tea Party - driven by a  similar anger towards elites. But the social networks of people tweeting  about the two movements suggest that they have rather different  dynamics. Those tweeting about the Tea Party emerge as a  tight-knit “in crowd”, following one another’s tweets. By contrast, the  network of people tweeting about Occupy consists of a looser series of  clusters, in which the output of a few key people is being vigorously  retweeted. The Occupy network also has many casual unconnected  tweeters, shown to the bottom right of the diagram below. Whether Occupy  takes off as a coherent movement may depend on its success in bringing  these potential recruits into the fold.

More at: One Per Cent: Occupy vs Tea Party: what their Twitter networks reveal

According to some political commentators, Occupy Wall Street is the left’s answer to the Tea Party - driven by a similar anger towards elites. But the social networks of people tweeting about the two movements suggest that they have rather different dynamics.
 
Those tweeting about the Tea Party emerge as a tight-knit “in crowd”, following one another’s tweets. By contrast, the network of people tweeting about Occupy consists of a looser series of clusters, in which the output of a few key people is being vigorously retweeted.

The Occupy network also has many casual unconnected tweeters, shown to the bottom right of the diagram below. Whether Occupy takes off as a coherent movement may depend on its success in bringing these potential recruits into the fold.

More at: One Per Cent: Occupy vs Tea Party: what their Twitter networks reveal