Our Common Good

Nearly two-in-three Americans say they believe President Obama will make a sincere effort to reach bipartisan solutions to the country’s woes, but only about half say the same thing about congressional Republicans, according to results of USA Today/Gallup poll released Monday.

Sixty-five percent of Americans said they believe Obama will make a sincere effort to work with Republican leaders to find solutions to the nation’s problems. Fifty-seven percent said the same of Democrats in Congress. Only 48 percent said Republicans in Congress will make a sincere bipartisan effort.

Democrats appear more bullish than Republicans that the opposing party will compromise, with 38 percent of the Democrats who were polled saying Republicans will make a sincere bipartisan effort, and just 27 percent of Republicans saying the same thing about Democrats.

A new poll by Hart Research’s Geoff Garin, conducted for Americans for Tax Fairness - a group that wants the Bush-era tax cuts on earners over $250,000 to end - found that a majority of voters cited changing the tax system as a key factor in their votes, and that the majority broke for President Obama.

The survey also found that Democrats have changed the landscape on an issue that has eluded them for years - taxes. The survey found that has most want the Bush-era cuts on top earners to expire, but that Republicans will shoulder blame if all of the Bush cuts, including those on the middle class, expire because a deal can’t be reached.

More voters than ever now identify themselves as pro-choice when it comes to abortion, and most rate the issue as important to how they vote.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey of Likely U.S. Voters shows that 54% describe themselves as pro-choice on the issue of abortion, while 38% say they are pro-life. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Now that President Obama has been elected to a second term, political opponents of his landmark health care reform law are beginning to concede that Obamacare is here to stay. And the general public agrees.

As a new Kaiser Family Foundation poll reports, the majority of Americans don’t support repealing Obamacare. In fact, after the presidential election, the number of Americans advocating for a full repeal of the health reform law dropped to an all-time low at just 33 percent — compared to nearly half of Americans who would rather keep the law in place:

Last week, House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) acknowledged that Obamacare is “the law of the land,” suggesting that Republicans in Congress may finally cease their repeated attempts to repeal the law. But his office quickly walked those statements back, clarifying that Republicans remain very committed to opposing Obama’s health reform.

However, if Republican lawmakers continue to stand in opposition to Obamacare by undermining some of the health law’s key provisions, public opinion still isn’t on their side. Previous polling has shown that Americans tend to be broadly supportive of Obamacare’s individual provisions — such as allowing young adults to remain on their parents’ insurance plans, and preventing insurance companies from discriminating against Americans with pre-existing conditions — even if they remain unsure about what the entire law means for the country.

The declining support for repealing the health law is a blow to the anti-Obamacare candidates who poured over $20 million into advertisements attacking the Affordable Care Act during the 2012 election cycle. On the other hand, at least six candidates in tight races across the country won last week after advocating for the health reform law throughout their campaigns.

quickhits:

Americans already blame GOP for driving off the fiscal cliff.

Politico:
Americans are prepared to blame Congressional Republicans any failure to avert the fiscal cliff, according to a poll on Tuesday.
While 51 percent of Americans don’t expect a deal, Democrats have substantially more faith than Republicans in the ability of President Barack Obama and Congressional Republicans to compromise, according to the Washington Post-Pew Research Center poll. Two-thirds of Republicans aren’t anticipating a deal, and only a quarter expect one. But a plurality of Democrats — 47 percent to 40 percent — expect Obama and the GOP to reach an agreement.
Congressional Republicans are likely to face the blame for any impact: 53 percent of Americans said the GOP would be at fault, compared with 29 percent who said the same of the president. Ten percent said both would be to blame. The gap is even bigger among independent voters, only 23 percent of whom would blame the president.

Consider that math: 51% believe we’ll sail off the fiscal cliff and 53% blame Republicans — before any failure at all. Nothing has happened yet and already people are blaming Republicans. If Republicans were hoping people haven’t been paying attention, they’re going to be disappointed. Republican obstructionism has become so ingrained in people’s minds that they expect it.
Republicans are going to have to spend a lot of time on image repair. They’ve dinged their reputation much worse than they’d probably imagined.

quickhits:

Americans already blame GOP for driving off the fiscal cliff.

Politico:

Americans are prepared to blame Congressional Republicans any failure to avert the fiscal cliff, according to a poll on Tuesday.

While 51 percent of Americans don’t expect a deal, Democrats have substantially more faith than Republicans in the ability of President Barack Obama and Congressional Republicans to compromise, according to the Washington Post-Pew Research Center poll. Two-thirds of Republicans aren’t anticipating a deal, and only a quarter expect one. But a plurality of Democrats — 47 percent to 40 percent — expect Obama and the GOP to reach an agreement.

Congressional Republicans are likely to face the blame for any impact: 53 percent of Americans said the GOP would be at fault, compared with 29 percent who said the same of the president. Ten percent said both would be to blame. The gap is even bigger among independent voters, only 23 percent of whom would blame the president.

Consider that math: 51% believe we’ll sail off the fiscal cliff and 53% blame Republicans — before any failure at all. Nothing has happened yet and already people are blaming Republicans. If Republicans were hoping people haven’t been paying attention, they’re going to be disappointed. Republican obstructionism has become so ingrained in people’s minds that they expect it.

Republicans are going to have to spend a lot of time on image repair. They’ve dinged their reputation much worse than they’d probably imagined.

President Obama leads Ohio by 4 points, according to a new poll from Democratic-leaning Public Policy Polling. Obama gets 51 percent to Republican candidate Mitt Romney’s 47 percent, an improvement for the president from his 49 percent to Romney’s 48 percent advantage in PPP’s Ohio poll last weekend.

The new poll pushes Obama only one-tenth of a percent away from 50 percent in the PollTracker Average of Ohio.

While many conservative Catholics cheered the move, Romney received no “Catholic bounce” from selecting Ryan, according to the Pew poll. Obama’s vice-presidential running mate, Joe Biden, is also Catholic. Liberal Catholics, including some nuns, have chastised Ryan for using his Catholic faith to defend his GOP budget plan, which lowers taxes on the wealthy while cutting programs for the poor.

Obama Surges Ahead Among Catholic Voters, Poll (via apsies)

Guess they forgot that Joe Biden is Catholic.

The latest release of the Gallup Daily tracking poll Wednesday showed President Barack Obama leading Republican nominee Mitt Romney by six percentage points (50 to 44 percent), a shift from the tied race their tracking had shown just five days earlier.

Other polls have shown similar Obama leads in recent weeks, but some saw the Gallup shift as evidence of further damage to Romney from his now infamous comments on “the 47 percent” at a private fundraiser. Less noticed and perhaps more important is that Obama’s September gains in voter preference match a modest but critical boost in his job approval ratings, as Gallup reported on Thursday.

Recent surveys have shown widespread awareness and mostly negative reactions to Romney’s 47 percent remarks. As of this writing, the HuffPost Pollster tracking model, which draws on all national and state level polling, shows Obama’s lead over Romney expanding by nearly a full percentage point since September 16, the day before news about Romney’s comments first appeared.

Perhaps more important, and separate from the 47 percent controversy, the rise in Obama’s job approval rating registered just after the Democratic convention has persisted. As reported by Gallup, Obama’s approval rating “has been 50% or higher in each of the last four Gallup Daily tracking figures,” roughly comparable to the levels they measured following the Democratic convention.

Time now to focus on House and Senate races, while NOT taking the presidential race for granted.

A new poll, run by Yale University and George Mason University in Virginia, has found that, when it comes to their views on climate change, “undecideds” look remarkably similar to supporters of Barack Obama.

Of the 1061 people polled, about three-quarters are judged likely to vote, based on their registration, stated intentions and past turnout. Among them, just 27 per cent of Romney backers believed global warming was human-caused, compared to 65 per cent of the Obama supporters.

simonstern:

After catching Mitt Romney repeating another obvious falsehood,Greg Sargent noted this afternoon, “I know this risks getting boring and predictable, but we really should document them all.”

And here they are…

Among likely voters, 50 percent put the onus on Bush for the ongoing sluggish economic, 25 percent blamed President Obama and 4 percent blamed former President Bill Clinton in the poll conducted by CVOTER International. Among confirmed voters, 44 percent blamed Bush, 36 percent Obama and 8 percent Clinton.

Asked who could better handle the economy 33 percent of likely voters said Obama and 19 percent said Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, with 28 percent saying neither man is equipped for the job. Among confirmed voters, 35 percent said Obama, 42 percent went with Romney and 13 percent rejected both men.

"The voter sentiment behind the disparate figures is not difficult to comprehend. Likely voters that may not turn up at the voting booth are more Democratic-leaning than Republican given their demographic — largely low-income, ethnic minorities," the pollsters said.

(via Michele Bachmann’s Latest Poll Numbers Are Frightening | The New Civil Rights Movement)